Distinguish Between Western Ghats and Eastern Ghats

Distinguish Between Western Ghats and Eastern Ghats

The Deccan plateau is one of India’s main landmasses and one of the country’s physiographic divisions. These ghats are an integral part of the IAS Exam’s Geography syllabus. It is important to distinguish between western ghats and eastern ghats.  The Western Ghats, also known as the Sahyadri, are continuous mountain ranges, whereas the Eastern Ghats are discontinuous mountain ranges. In some parts of India, the Western Ghats are referred to as Sahyadri. Students will come across the question distinguish between western ghats and eastern ghats in their exams. They go parallel to India’s western coast. It is quite tough to get through them because they are continuous with no notable breaks. Although this difficulty has been reduced in recent years due to advances in transportation technology, passing the ghats and crossing to the other side was formerly a major undertaking. The eastern ghats of India run parallel to the country’s eastern coastal lowlands, this can be added as one of the points in distinguish between western ghats and eastern ghats. They are discontinuous in character, unlike the western ghats, and are dissected by rivers that pour into the Bay of Bengal. As previously stated, the western ghats are the source of the majority of these rivers. The eastern ghats are lower in elevation than the western ghats, which should be observed.  Jindhagada is the tallest peak in the Eastern Ghats. Arma Konda and Sitamma Konda are two other names for it. It’s also possible to compare the elevation levels of the highest peaks in both ghats. This gives a good notion of the height disparities between the hills in both ghats.

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