Social Learning Theory

Social learning theory 
Students should acquire good habits from others, the observational skills should be very good to gain knowledge about how people behave in different situations. When the students will observe others they will learn from the experience of others. If a person is doing something wrong they can avoid being in the same situation with the help of social learning theory. Social learning theory is a concept of learning and social manner which formulates that new behaviors can be obtained by observing and simulating others. This memorization is a cognitive process that takes place in a social context and can occur morally through compliance or direct instruction, even in the shortage of motor imitation or direct reinforcement. In addition to the observation of attitude, learning also transpires through the observation of dividends and retributions, a process known as vicarious reinforcement. When a specific behavior is awarded regularly, it will most aptly persist; contrarily, if a particular attitude is constantly penalized, it will be most inclined to desist. Social learning theory expands on conventional behavioral hypotheses, in which behavior is regulated solely by support, by promoting the significant roles of various internal procedures in learning someone. This theory explains that social behavior is learned by observing and imitating the behavior of others. While behavioral psychology concentrates on how the atmosphere and support affect behavior. Social learning is distinguished as learning through the observation of other students’ attitudes. Students should observe everything going on in their surroundings, they should only learn good things and not the bad ones.

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