How to Study for REET

REET (Rajasthan Eligibility Examination of Teachers) is a crucial state-level exam conducted every year to select candidates for teaching jobs in the state of Rajasthan. The examination is organized for Level I and Level II, where Level I selects teachers for classes 1 to 5 (primary teachers) and Level II select teachers for classes 6 to 8 or upper primary classes. Let’s see how to study for REET effectively.

REET, or RTET (Rajasthan Teacher Eligibility Test) as it is also known, is an offline paper conducted by the Board of Secondary Education, Rajasthan. Every year thousands of candidates appear for the exam, making it highly competitive. To pass the exam with ease, the aspiring candidates must strategically plan their preparation.

Here are a few tips that can help you plan your study effectively for the exam.

How to Study for REET- Know the REET Syllabus and Exam Pattern

Considering the REET exam pattern varies for Level I and Level II, the study strategy must be slightly different depending upon the syllabus:

  • Level I for primary teachers consists of five sections, and the difficulty measure is of the 12th standard. 
  • Level II consists of four subjects, but the difficulty measure goes up to graduation level. 

Candidates must be aware of the entire REET syllabus, the exam duration, total number of questions, maximum marks, and negative marking. Depending upon these considerations, a candidate must make a timetable, where every topic is allocated time and focus as per the exam structure and marking scheme. 

Prioritize your Study Based on Subjects and Topics

Not every subject or topic for the REET exam has the same difficulty level or same marking weightage. Hence, instead of randomly picking topics, it is wise to prioritize them.

  • Level I has five subjects: Child development & Pedagogy, Mathematics, Language I, Language II, Environmental Studies. A total of 150 questions are asked, where the focus on each subject is 30 questions. Therefore, the candidates can prioritize the subject they have a good grasp of and then move in descending order with other subjects. Since all subjects carry equal marks, it is vital not to leave out any subject.
  • Level II has four subjects: Child development & Pedagogy, Language I, Language II, Science & Mathematics. A total of 150 questions are asked, where the weightage of the first three subjects is 30 questions, and the last one is 60 questions. While leaving topics is never advised, it is better to prioritize your study plan with topics of an easy grasp down to the tough ones. This will help you get a thorough understanding of most topics. 

Prepare Handy Notes

Notes can prove to be your best study companion. This simple yet effective technique helps you retain the topics’ learning for a long time. And, if you forget a few, all you have to do is go back in your notebook and recall the ‘what’ and ‘how’ of that topic. Keep these tips in mind while making notes:

  • Make notes in a way that helps you learn rather than copy precisely what is written in the books. Your mind will process topics better in your individual learning style.
  • Review your notes daily or regularly to help reinforce the information you gathered.
  • Revise your notes just before the exam, instead of using the books, to get a reinforcement of familiar ideas.

Learn Quick Tricks

Quick tricks are the best way to solve or answer a query in a limited time. While the comprehensive REET syllabus can be overwhelming for some candidates, learning with tricks will help your mind remember better. For example, instead of doing actual multiplication for a four-figure question, learn mental math or the shortcut method of solving it within seconds.

A time-bound competitive exam expects the use of such tricks for you to save time for difficult questions.

Make a Schedule

“A schedule defends from chaos and whim” stands apt when you are an aspiring candidate for a competitive exam. You can prepare as much as you want without a schedule, but it would be nothing like taking an actual exam. However, when you maintain a schedule for the exam preparations and follow it, you know exactly what you are going to face. 

A schedule makes you time-efficient, ready for any surprises (the difficult questions), and aware of what needs to be attempted first. All in all, it prepares you for what lies in the actual exam.

 Practice REET Mock Practice Papers

Unless you put yourself through similar questions in a time-bound environment, you will not understand what it will be like when you take the REET exam. This is where mock practice papers come to the rescue. 

  • Attempt as many mock practice papers before the REET exam.
  • Create an environment of the examination room by sitting on a chair with a table in the front instead of being comfortable on the sofa or bed.
  • Set the time duration to two hours and half minutes and complete marking answers within this time.
  • Attempt the questions in the same pattern as you would in the actual test.

Solve Previous Year’s Question Papers

Previous years’ question papers give a good understanding of what can be expected. Even though the questions will be different for the current year’s REET exam, they give an idea of the question pattern on different topics and subjects. 

You should try to solve at least the last five years’ question papers for practice and thorough understanding. 

Track and Analyse your Performance 

No matter how many mock papers and previous year papers you attempt to prepare for the REET exam or devise the best schedule as a part of your study plan, it will all go to waste if you do not track your performance. Learning from our mistakes is a golden suggestion we have all received, so try to implement it in your study plan for REET too.

  • Know your score for every mock test
  • Analyse your strengths and weaknesses
  • Work on your weaknesses to improve your score
  • Try to surpass your own last score every time

The most important of it all is not to feel disheartened if you get a low score. REET can be a challenging exam for the level of competition it has. So, every time your score is low in your mock tests, make sure to improve upon your weak topics/subjects and strike back with a better score.

The last tip is not to procrastinate and start your study plan today because every milestone is only a milestone until it is achieved.

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REET (Rajasthan Eligibility Examination of Teachers) is a crucial state-level exam conducted every year to select candidates for teaching jobs in the state of Rajasthan. The examination is organized for Level I and Level II, where Level I selects teachers for classes 1 to 5 (primary teachers) and Level II selects teachers for classes 6 to 8 or upper primary classes. 

REET, or RTET (Rajasthan Teacher Eligibility Test) as it is also known, is an offline paper conducted by the Board of Secondary Education, Rajasthan. Every year thousands of candidates appear for the exam, making it highly competitive. To pass the exam with ease, the aspiring candidates must strategically plan their preparation.

Here are a few tips that can help you plan your study effectively for the exam.

Know the REET Syllabus and Exam Pattern

Considering the REET exam pattern varies for Level I and Level II, the study strategy must be slightly different depending upon the syllabus:

  • Level I for primary teachers consists of five sections, and the difficulty measure is of the 12th standard. 
  • Level II consists of four subjects, but the difficulty measure goes up to graduation level. 

Candidates must be aware of the entire REET syllabus, the exam duration, total number of questions, maximum marks, and negative marking. Depending upon these considerations, a candidate must make a timetable, where every topic is allocated time and focus as per the exam structure and marking scheme. 

Prioritize your Study Based on Subjects and Topics

Not every subject or topic for the REET exam has the same difficulty level or same marking weightage. Hence, instead of randomly picking topics, it is wise to prioritize them.

  • Level I has five subjects: Child development & Pedagogy, Mathematics, Language I, Language II, Environmental Studies. A total of 150 questions are asked, where the focus on each subject is 30 questions. Therefore, the candidates can prioritize the subject they have a good grasp of and then move in descending order with other subjects. Since all subjects carry equal marks, it is vital not to leave out any subject.
  • Level II has four subjects: Child development & Pedagogy, Language I, Language II, Science & Mathematics. A total of 150 questions are asked, where the weightage of the first three subjects is 30 questions, and the last one is 60 questions. While leaving topics is never advised, it is better to prioritize your study plan with topics of an easy grasp down to the tough ones. This will help you get a thorough understanding of most topics. 

Prepare Handy Notes

Notes can prove to be your best study companion. This simple yet effective technique helps you retain the topics’ learning for a long time. And, if you forget a few, all you have to do is go back in your notebook and recall the ‘what’ and ‘how’ of that topic. Keep these tips in mind while making notes:

  • Make notes in a way that helps you learn rather than copy precisely what is written in the books. Your mind will process topics better in your individual learning style.
  • Review your notes daily or regularly to help reinforce the information you gathered.
  • Revise your notes just before the exam, instead of using the books, to get a reinforcement of familiar ideas.

Learn Quick Tricks

Quick tricks are the best way to solve or answer a query in a limited time. While the comprehensive REET syllabus can be overwhelming for some candidates, learning with tricks will help your mind remember better. For example, instead of doing actual multiplication for a four-figure question, learn mental math or the shortcut method of solving it within seconds.

A time-bound competitive exam expects the use of such tricks for you to save time for difficult questions.

Make a Schedule

“A schedule defends from chaos and whim” stands apt when you are an aspiring candidate for a competitive exam. You can prepare as much as you want without a schedule, but it would be nothing like taking an actual exam. However, when you maintain a schedule for the exam preparations and follow it, you know exactly what you are going to face. 

A schedule makes you time-efficient, ready for any surprises (the difficult questions), and aware of what needs to be attempted first. All in all, it prepares you for what lies in the actual exam.

 Practice REET Mock Practice Papers

Unless you put yourself through similar questions in a time-bound environment, you will not understand what it will be like when you take the REET exam. This is where mock practice papers come to the rescue. 

  • Attempt as many mock practice papers before the REET exam.
  • Create an environment of the examination room by sitting on a chair with a table in the front instead of being comfortable on the sofa or bed.
  • Set the time duration to two hours and half minutes and complete marking answers within this time.
  • Attempt the questions in the same pattern as you would in the actual test.

Solve Previous Year’s Question Papers

Previous years’ question papers give a good understanding of what can be expected. Even though the questions will be different for the current year’s REET exam, they give an idea of the question pattern on different topics and subjects. 

You should try to solve at least the last five years’ question papers for practice and thorough understanding. 

Track and Analyse your Performance 

No matter how many mock papers and previous year papers you attempt to prepare for the REET exam or devise the best schedule as a part of your study plan, it will all go to waste if you do not track your performance. Learning from our mistakes is a golden suggestion we have all received, so try to implement it in your study plan for REET too.

  • Know your score for every mock test
  • Analyse your strengths and weaknesses
  • Work on your weaknesses to improve your score
  • Try to surpass your own last score every time

The most important of it all is not to feel disheartened if you get a low score. REET can be a challenging exam for the level of competition it has. So, every time your score is low in your mock tests, make sure to improve upon your weak topics/subjects and strike back with a better score.

The last tip is not to procrastinate and start your study plan today because every milestone is only a milestone until it is achieved.

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