Life Sciences

The life sciences have changed enormously: various new disciplines, like genomic and metabolomic technologies, have completely revolutionized the normative and descriptive power wielded by these disciplines. The new scientific approaches accompanying the technological development and positions make the practices in the laboratories of the life sciences dramatically different from life science before these developments. 

Newer organizations of scientific work have emerged and are emerging, and this has a deep social and normative impact. In these new life science practices and approaches, new values and norms are incorporated that are considerably different from the earlier forms of life science. Both externally and internally, these life sciences have gained new forms of descriptive and normative impact. These impacts have an impact on human rights, both in a positive as well as in a negative way, but they regard ownership issues as well. 

Even though ownership issues of the life sciences are being regulated via the Intellectual Property Rights regime currently, it is doubtful as to how far this regime can organize life science innovations, both from the perspective of the progressive developments of the life sciences as well as from the light of human rights. Patents and other types of ownership will hence be extensively discussed.
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