Inorganic Chemistry

Inorganic chemistry deals with the synthesis and behavior of inorganic and metallic compounds. The inorganic chemistry field covers chemical compounds that are not based on carbon. The distinction between inorganic and organic chemistry is far from absolute since there is much overlap in the subdiscipline of metallic chemistry. It has applications in each and every aspect of the chemical industry, including agriculture, catalysis, coatings, fuels, materials science, pigments, surfactants, and medications.

Many inorganic compounds are ionic compounds, which consist of cations and anions joined by ionic bonding. Anions and cations combine to form salts. In any salt, the proportions of the ions are such that their charges cancel out so that the bulk compound is electrically neutral. The ions described by their oxidation state and the ease of formation can be inferred from the cation’s ionization potential or from the anion’s electron affinity of the parent elements.

Important classes of inorganic compounds include oxides, carbonates, sulphates, and halides. A lot of inorganic compounds are characterized by their high melting points. Inorganic salts are generally poor conductors in their solid state. Other features of inorganic salts include their high melting point as well as ease of crystallization. Where some salts are extremely soluble in water, some others are not.

It also deals with the mathematical aspects of chemistry such as kinematics, probability, etc. The speed of atoms in a liquid, their energy, inelastic collisions, all come under the vast umbrella of organic chemistry.

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