Inductive Method of Teaching

The inductive method of teaching begins with examples and asks students to figure out the rules. This method is distinguished from a deductive approach that begins with giving learners the rules, then examples, then practice. We can take an example where students listen to a dialogue that includes examples of the use of the third conditional. Teachers check if students understand the meaning of its use by checking students’ understanding of the listening text and only then do they continue, using examples of text to understand the rules of form, use of sounds, and pronunciation. The inductive approach to introducing a new language is often found in textbooks and is part of a general strategy to engage students in what they are learning. Students will require an introduction to the inductive method of teaching as they may be more familiar with and more comfortable with the deductive method of teaching. Instead of explaining a given concept and following that explanation with examples, teachers show students lots of examples that describe how the concept is used. The goal of the inductive method of teaching students is to pay attention, with examples, to how they need to apply concepts. In the inductive approach, without encountering rules, the student studies examples and from these examples, an understanding of the concept is derived. Teachers should present several examples in their best order to lead to generalization. Students should compare and analyze sentences, for example, changing active into passive. Sentences are compared, contrasted, and analyzed based on similarities and differences, for example, subject, predicate, and object.

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