Brain-Based Learning

The Glossary of Education Reform defines brain-based learning based on teaching methods, lesson designs, and school programs in cognizance with the latest scientific research. It shows how the brain learns, which helps to understand the students’ different learning skills based on age, maturity, and cognition. Each child is unique and has different learning styles.

Brain-based learning is a theory that includes learning strategies based on attention span, memory retention, yearning to learn, and conceptual knowledge. It is about smarter, purposeful teaching that can reach a large number of students. It is not confined to an activity but is an amalgamation of environment, instructions, and curriculum strategies. 

Brain-based learning is not a typically new discipline but rather a comprehensive approach to instruction with current neuroscience inputs.

Brain-based learning techniques have proven to constitute winning ways of imparting education to children and adults alike. Activities centred around experiential learning include hands-on activities, including projects, role-playing, and creativity. Individuals learn through trial and error and participation. 

For instance, trial and error processing actualizes in the case of an infant walking for the very first time. The child has an intrinsic motivation to stand and walk, which takes time. In the beginning, the child needs to learn to stand and balance before taking his first steps. Though the child will fall, he will eventually master the activity of walking through experiential processing. 

Brain-based learning also includes several technologies such as visual aids and media platforms to constitute an interactive classroom. For instance, e-learning is made possible through computers, video, cameras, phones, and radios to maximize the quality of interactive learning.

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