Curriculum Design

The term Curriculum Design refers to the period for creating the overall blueprint of the course. In this phase, teachers organize the instructional units for their course. A usual curriculum involves planning readings, activities, lessons, and assessments that achieve academic goals. It is a deliberate, purposeful, and systematic organization of the curriculum. The ultimate goal of a design is to improve student learning. That is why instructors design each curriculum with a specific academic purpose. However, learning objectives need to be aligned, and must complement each other in various stages. 

Curriculum design has three basic types. These include: 

1. Subject-centered design: This type of design revolves around a particular subject. For instance, it can focus on English or physics. The focus of this design is more on the subject, and not the individual. It clearly states what needs to be studied and how to go about it. The main drawback of a subject-centered design is that it isn’t student-centered. That tends to cause issues in student engagement. 

2. Learner-centered design: Unlike the subject-centered design, this one takes each individual’s interests and goals into consideration. It adjusts to the needs of the students, meeting them halfway. Learner-centered design is meant to empower students by allowing them to shape their education through choices. Learners get to choose assignments and activities that lead to more engagement and motivation. Being labor-intensive is the only drawback of this design. 

3. Problem-Centered Design: This design too is a student-centered design. The main focus of the problem-centered design is on assisting learners with efficient problem-solving. As learners get exposed to real-life issues, it helps them in developing essential skills, transferable to the real world. Students are allowed to be innovative and creative while learning. Not considering learning styles is the only drawback of this design. 

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